• After previously denying it, Doja Cat has apologized for her racist statements.
  • She issued a statement on Twitter, as well.
  • But is she sorry for what she did, or just sorry she got caught?

Doja Cat is saying sorry.

The “Moooo!” rapper, who first came into the spotlight in 2018, took to her Instagram to issue a lengthy apology that seemed to raise more eyebrows than anything else.

Doja Cat’s apology created more havoc than anything else. | Source: Instagram

It’s interesting how her apology created more havoc instead of quelling the waters. Let’s look at why.

Doja Cat Claims She’s Not A Racist

Tone-deaf and racist are not the same thing, to be sure. But when it comes to dealing in race relations, it’s always best to err on the side of caution.

While her ill-advised behavior has indeed been previously addressed, Doja Cat doesn’t seem to have gotten the memo.

It’s not exactly clear which sites she’d allegedly been a part of “since she was a teen.” Was it something like 4Chan and Reddit, where trolling is almost a requirement? Or was it something more serious, like StormFront? Either way, her behavior was ill-advised, at best.

Certainly, too, there’s always room for growth. Who’s to say Doja Cat can’t be a different person from what she was five years ago?

Except there’s the issue of her song that proves otherwise.

Only Sorry She Got Caught

“Dindu Nuffin,” which was released in 2015, used racial slurs and mocked victims of police brutality.

And while Doja Cat is claiming that “it was in no way tied to anything outside of my own personal experience,” the validity of that statement is called into question.

2015 was a banner year for victims of police brutality, for all the wrong reasons. Of the more than 1,100 people killed by police brutality that year, more than 15% of all those killings were of young Black men. What’s more, that rate is five times higher than the killings of young white men of the same age. When the full picture is taken into account, 1 in 65 deaths of young black men was thanks to police brutality.

That makes Doja Cat’s song — and alleged racism — all the worse.

And in 2015, when “Dindu Nuffin” was released, there was nothing funny about those statistics — just like there’s nothing worth mocking now.

Doja Cat isn’t sorry for her actions. She’s sorry she got caught.

This article was edited by Aaron Weaver.